Psychological Drama THE SURROGATE Opens June 12th in Virtual Cinemas

Written and Directed by Jeremy Hersh

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Jess Harris (Jasmine Batchelor, “The Good Fight”), a 29-year-old web designer for a nonprofit in Brooklyn, is ecstatic to be the surrogate and egg-donor for her best friend Josh (Chris Perfetti, “Looking”) and his husband Aaron (Sullivan Jones, Slave Play). Twelve weeks into the pregnancy, a prenatal test comes back with unexpected results that pose a moral dilemma. As they all consider the best course of action, the relationship between the three friends is put to the test.

 


Rating:4.5
4.5/5
Great Movie!
Great Plot
rb5stars
Characters
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Originality
rb5stars
Engaging
rb5stars
Music Score
rb1star

A very moving drama by Jeremy Hersh. Superbly written, outstanding direction, and beautifully photographed. The only reason I give the film a 4.5 star instead of 5 is because of the lack of a soundtrack. Although it was moving and mesmerizing in its approach to the point of bringing a tear to my eyes at one point, an atmospheric soundtrack could have easily had me actually crying.

A relevant issue to address LGBTQ life in the 21st century as we move into the realm of marriage equality and parenting. And one that needs more attention.

All the acting was first-rate, but Jasmine Batchelor gave an amazing performance as Jess.

I literally loved the movie and highly recommend it to anyone.


The Surrogate will open in virtual theaters on June 12th
Monument Releasing will be partnering directly with theaters and cultural organizations

Visit the Website

About the Director

Jeremy Hersh is a filmmaker and playwright based in New York. His short film Actresses premiered at Sundance 2015 where Time Out New York named it one of their five favorite shorts of the festival. Actresses went on to screen at SXSW, BAMCinemafest, and The New Orleans Film Festival, where it won the audience award for best narrative short. Jeremy’s undergraduate thesis film Natives premiered at SXSW 2013 and went on to play numerous festivals including BFI Flare in London. Jeremy was a fellow of the 2015 Film Society of Lincoln Center Artist Academy.

 

Director’s Statement

I came of age being told that as a queer person, I was entitled to the same rights as straight people, including having biological children if I wanted to. I set out to write a film about a relationship between queer people and their chosen family who are confronted with the same types of difficult questions (ethical and otherwise) that all potential parents have to answer, questions that are becoming increasingly complicated due to recent advances in prenatal testing technology. I don’t have the answers to these questions, or a particular message I set out to convey, but I’m interested in the various points of view and conversations these questions provoke.

I make movies partly as a way of investigating my own blind spots, in order to hopefully identify them and learn from them. Like so many among us, the characters in The Surrogate pride themselves on being open-minded progressives who talk openly and freely about everything. The conflict in the film arises when they’re finally confronted with something they don’t know how to talk about. Ultimately, the characters have to confront the gap between ideals and practical realities.