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Home arrow Reviews arrow Reviews By Duane arrow Reviews By Duane arrow Green Briefs
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Written by Duane Simolke   
Nov 24, 2013 at 05:38 PM
Guest House Films continues its series of gay short film collections. Green Briefs is not only my favorite in the series but also one of the most consistently strong short film DVDs I’ve seen. Each feature won critical praise and multiple awards separately. Together, they explore various ways family affects the lives of gay boys or men.
Pride. Director Marc Saltarelli presents a tale of contrasts, starting with a character played by Pauley Perrette of NCIS fame. After too much time tirelessly caring for her father, she asks her brother (Stephen, played by Perry Laylon Ojeda) to take over for a while. Because of their house’s location on the gay pride route, Stephen and his partner are hosting a big pride party. Stephen’s resistance stems from something other than a busy day, though. He can’t stop remembering when his father kicked him out for being gay, even if Alzheimer’s might keep his father from remembering.
The Commitment. Written, directed by, and starring Albert M. Chan, this drama examines the raw emotions of an interracial couple trying to adopt a newborn baby. They both want everything to work out and both worry about causing or facing disappointment. A mixture of cultures and a few sad moments can’t stop a hopeful undercurrent or the chemistry between Chan and co-star Jason Lane Fenton. Expectant mother Victoria (Kerri Patterson) wants to grant their dream of an Asian baby but the plot takes surprise turns.
Shabbat Dinner. Directed by Michael Morgenstern, this film takes a much lighter tone than the rest but still brings out family drama. It also looks satirically at hypocrisy. A teenager gets stuck entertaining another teen while the grownups visit, drink, and argue. The two teens learn more than they expected about each other and go much further than they expected.
Kimchi Fried Dumplings. This film from writer/director Jason Karman overlaps with some of the other stories, in terms of certain themes and elements. It involves a gay Asian man who drifted away from his family after breaking up with his boyfriend. He returns for Christmas, only to find that his younger gay brother now resents him for not being there to help their aging parents. While I enjoyed all the Green Briefs selections, I especially loved some of the tender moments in this one. The understated performances make it work.
The Symphony of Silence. Written and directed by San Antonio native Cedric Thomas Smith, this disturbing drama reveals the cycle of bullying. Each high school bully finds ways to justify his actions, often giving into pressure from others who mistreat or might mistreat him. The family angle comes from the fact that one of the victims is the brother of one of the aggressors. He lives in fear of taunts and violence both at home and at school.
Rob Williams, co-founder of Guest House Films, put together a treasury of stories that complement each other and challenge viewers to think about what family means for the gay community. The resulting DVD is entertaining and thought-provoking.
Green Briefs is distributed by Guest House Films.
<I><a href=http://DuaneSimolke.Com>Duane Simolke</a> wrote <a href=http://duanesimolke.blogspot.com/2009/06/degranon-science-fiction-adventure-by.html>Degranon: A Science Fiction Adventure</a>, <a href=http://duanesimolke.blogspot.com/2012/06/west-texas-librarian-makes-fun-of.html target="Resource Window">Fat Diary</a>, and <a href=http://duanesimolke.blogspot.com/2009/06/acorn-stories_20.html>The Acorn Stories</a>.</I>

Guest House Films continues its series of gay short film collections. Green Briefs is not only my favorite in the series but also one of the most consistently strong short film DVDs I’ve seen. Each feature won critical praise and multiple awards separately. Together, they explore various ways family affects the lives of gay boys or men.

Pride. Director Marc Saltarelli presents a tale of contrasts, starting with a character played by Pauley Perrette of NCIS fame. After too much time tirelessly caring for her father, she asks her brother (Stephen, played by Perry Laylon Ojeda) to take over for a while. Because of their house’s location on the gay pride route, Stephen and his partner are hosting a big pride party. Stephen’s resistance stems from something other than a busy day, though. He can’t stop remembering when his father kicked him out for being gay, even if Alzheimer’s might keep his father from remembering.

The Commitment. Written, directed by, and starring Albert M. Chan, this drama examines the raw emotions of an interracial couple trying to adopt a newborn baby. They both want everything to work out and both worry about causing or facing disappointment. A mixture of cultures and a few sad moments can’t stop a hopeful undercurrent or the chemistry between Chan and co-star Jason Lane Fenton. Expectant mother Victoria (Kerri Patterson) wants to grant their dream of an Asian baby but the plot takes surprise turns.



Shabbat Dinner. Directed by Michael Morgenstern, this film takes a much lighter tone than the rest but still brings out family drama. It also looks satirically at hypocrisy. A teenager gets stuck entertaining another teen while the grownups visit, drink, and argue. The two teens learn more than they expected about each other and go much further than they expected.

Kimchi Fried Dumplings. This film from writer/director Jason Karman overlaps with some of the other stories, in terms of certain themes and elements. It involves a gay Asian man who drifted away from his family after breaking up with his boyfriend. He returns for Christmas, only to find that his younger gay brother now resents him for not being there to help their aging parents. While I enjoyed all the Green Briefs selections, I especially loved some of the tender moments in this one. The understated performances make it work.

The Symphony of Silence. Written and directed by San Antonio native Cedric Thomas Smith, this disturbing drama reveals the cycle of bullying. Each high school bully finds ways to justify his actions, often giving into pressure from others who mistreat or might mistreat him. The family angle comes from the fact that one of the victims is the brother of one of the aggressors. He lives in fear of taunts and violence both at home and at school.

Rob Williams, co-founder of Guest House Films, put together a treasury of stories that complement each other and challenge viewers to think about what family means for the gay community. The resulting DVD is entertaining and thought-provoking.

Green Briefs is distributed by Guest House Films.

Buy Green Briefs Here!

Duane Simolke wrote Degranon: A Science Fiction Adventure, Fat Diary, and The Acorn Stories.


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